OUR APPROACH

A Full Time Presence in Washington, D.C.

 

The importance of having a full-time presence in Washington, D.C. cannot be overstated.  Effective Federal representation requires the ability to not only navigate a complex and constantly changing political environment, but also to respond promptly and in person in order to meet the often unpredictable and unscheduled demands of government officials, Members of Congress and Capitol Hill staffers.   Furthermore, members of Congress often have to pick between competing constituencies – they can’t satisfy everyone 100% of the time – and they often have to prioritize the request of one constituent over another.  Members of Congress make their calculations based on who they are hearing from.  In fact, we have found time and again that the old adage is true: the squeaky wheel gets the grease.  With literally thousands of cities, counties, states, non-profit organizations, associations and companies fighting for limited time and attention, it is those that have strong relationships with key people in Washington, D.C. – and a constant presence in front of those people – that will be effective.

 

Keeping You “In the Know”

 

We excel at keeping our clients updated on Federal developments impacting their interests.  Our commitment is to keep our clients immediately apprised of all developments that impact them, to keep updates short and to the point, and to ensure our clients hear the news from us first.  

 

This includes:

 

  • Up-to-the-minute emails and phone calls that are brief and timely, designed to keep our clients apprised of any activity that will impact their priorities;

  • Reports that are particularly well-suited for briefing key stakeholders; 

  • We typically provide detailed monthly reports for the Contract Manager to monitor all activities.

 

Our clients will attest that they can always reach us and that we respond quickly and at all hours, even with time zone differences. 

FBB Federal Relations © 2017  | Main photo taken by John Peterson from Peter Friedmann's balcony